Top 5 Swedish Christmas Decoration Items for Your Home

Swedes love decoration. Particularly during the cold and dark winter season, Swedes make an effort to create a cozy atmosphere at home. Swedish homes are often well designed and equipped with thoughtfully chosen and placed decoration items.

Swedish Christmas food & traditions

Christmas Decoration in Sweden

Here are five of the most popular Swedish decoration items that you will find in a typical home in Sweden during Christmas.

  1. Candle holder, Ljusstake

    Swedish Christmas candle holder - ljusstake
    Swedish Christmas candle holder – ljusstake

    This candle holder can be found in the windows of many Swedish homes.

  2. Angel chimes, Änglaspel

    Swedish Christmas decoration - änglaspel
    Swedish Christmas decoration – änglaspel

    Rotating metal angels. The larger one creates a ringing sound with its two bells.

  3. Christmas goat, Julbock (Gävlebock) 

    Swedish Christmas decoration goat
    Swedish Christmas decoration goat

    In 1966, the first Christmas goat was set up in the city of Gävle. 13 meters high, seven meters long and four meters wide. A few days after Christmas an unknown person set it on fire – and thereby created a returning tradition of yearly attempts of burning down the Gävlebock.

    Many Swedish people buy a smaller version of it for their homes. Most of them remain unburnt.

  4. Little Santa Claus, Jultomte

    Swedish Christmas Santa Claus - jultomte
    Swedish Christmas Santa Claus – jultomte

    You find this little Santa in every Swedish shop that sells decoration items – made of wood, textiles or even glass. Usually with a big beard and a hat that covers his eyes. You never really know whether he is sleeping or not.

  5. Christmas star, Julstjärna

    Swedish Christmas star - julstjärna
    Swedish Christmas star – julstjärna

    This is a standard decoration item for almost every Swedish home. Placed in the window, it creates a beautiful atmosphere inside and outside the house.
    Some Swedes keep it switched on during daytime. “Why switching off for the 5 minutes of daylight during Swedish winters?”

More about Christmas in Sweden

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